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Music through the centuries

A musical journey from the Renaissance to the 20th century with members of the Royal Stockholm Philharmonic Orchestra.

Three pieces for brass quintet added with pieces for flute, viola and harp. It is a varied programme the members of the Royal Stockholm Philharmonic Orchestra have put together. At the same time taking us through the centuries, from the 16th to the 20th century. 

The French Renaissance Suite for brass quintet contains music by, among others, Orlando di Lasso. Then the 1915 Sonata for flute, viola and harp by Claude Debussy (1862–1918). ”It is frightfully mournful”, Debussy said, ”and I don't know whether one should laugh or cry – perhaps both?”

Russian composer Victor Ewald (1860–­1935) composed four pioneering brass quintets and the first is presented here. American Vincent Persichetti (1915–87), who was the teacher of Philip Glass, Leo Brouwer and others, is rather unknown outside of the US. His Serenade No. 10 for flute and harp shows both lyrical and intensely rytmical passages. 

The Dance Suite for brass quintet from 1989 was Leonard Bernstein’s (1918–90) last completed work. In five joyful movements it portrays his choreographer friends: Antony Tudor, Agnes George de Mille, Michail Barysjnikov, George Balanchine and Jerome Robbins.

Bach’s tender choral Ich ruf’ zu dir Herr Jesu Christ arranged for viola and harp concludes this musical journey.

  • The music

  • French Renaissance Suite, version for brass quintet arr Stefan Gustavsson
  • Claude Debussy Sonata for flute, viola and harp
  • Victor Ewald Brass Quintet No. 1
  • Vincent Persichetti Serenade No. 10 for flute and harp
  • Leonard Bernstein Dance Suite for brass quintet
  • Johann Sebastian Bach Chorale "Ich ruf´ zu dir, Herr Jesu Christ" BWV 639, version for viola and harp
  • Participants

  • Laura Stephenson harp
  • Andreas Alin flute
  • Vicki Powell viola
  • Urban Agnas trumpet
  • Tom Poulson trumpet
  • Martin Schöpfer french horn
  • Karl Frisendahl trombone
  • Karl-Johan Elf tuba
  • From a livestream 14 May 2020.
  • The video is approximately one hour and five minutes long.